Monday, March 24, 2014

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks: Archie's boy, Crofford Sawyer (1847-1916)

Last week I wrote about my great-great grandfather Archie Sawyer's son Andy. This week I am focusing on Crofford, the third of the five known sons of Archie and his wife, Sallie Killion. Archie and his boys are on my radar because of my focus on DNA research this year. I am on the hunt for male Sawyers descended from Archie to beg, borrow or bribe my way to a cheek swab for a yDNA test. Bounties will be paid to those who deliver a willing, living candidate. Cake, cookies, booze. Whatever works.


Joel Crawford or Crofford Sawyer (1847-1916) also lived his life in Cocke County, Tennessee. He married Melvina (Vina) Green. Together they had 8 children, including 3 sons who survived to adulthood. He spent his life farming, and perhaps logging with his brother Andrew. Crofford was old enough to have been affected by the Civil War, especially since he was living in East Tennessee. It is hard to imagine he was not involved in some way - even if it was simply trying to stay away from the roving bands of bushwackers.
    1. William Jehu Sawyer (1873-1943) married Sarah Jane Solomon. They had a large family that included at least six sons who survived to adulthood. 
      1. Crawford L. Sawyer (1900-1972) married Agnes Miller. They are not believed to have had surviving sons.
      2. Joe Andy Sawyer (1905-1961) married Ann Ward. They are not believed to have had surviving children.
      3. Reaford P. Sawyer (1903-1969) married Pearl Reed. They lived most of their adult lives in Hamblen County, Tennessee and had a large family. 
      4. Edward Edgar Sawyer (1907-1973) married Lennie Bell Smith. They lived most of their adult lives in Hamblen County, Tennessee and had a large family. He also appears in some records as William E. or Edgar Sawyer. 
      5. Thomas U. Sawyer (1912-2000) married Edna Walker. They lived most of their adult lives in Anderson County, Tennessee and had a large family.
      6. J. B. Sawyer (1914-1996) married Mayme Kate Moyers. They lived most of their adult life in Hamblen County, Tennessee and had a large family.
    2. Joel Lawson Sawyer (1877-1950) married Maude Conway, the sister of my great-grandmother Catherine Conway Sawyer, making their children double cousins to my grandfather and his siblings. They lived most of their lives in Cocke County, Tennessee and had a large family including 4 sons who survived to adulthood.
      1. Clyde Sawyer (1913-1985) married Creola Babe Baker. They are not believed to have had surviving sons.
      2. Kenneth Sawyer (1921-1981) was married and lived much of his life in Hamblen County, Tennessee. He is not believed to have had sons surviving to adulthood.
      3. Harley Guymond Sawyer (1925-1985) was married and lived in Cocke and Hamblen Counties, Tennessee. He is not believed to have had sons surviving to adulthood.
      4. Living Sawyer. The youngest son of Lawson and Maud Conway Sawyer is believed to still be living. 
    3. Joe A. Sawyer (1882-1972) married Fannie Robinson. They lived most of their lives in Cocke County, Tennessee and had a large family including 4 sons who survived to adulthood.
      1. Gerome or Jerome Sawyer (1917-1961) married and had children. He lived most of his life in Cocke County, Tennessee.
      2. Walter L. Sawyer (1921-2007) married Ida Flores and had children. He lived most of his life in Cocke County, Tennessee.
      3. Living Sawyer. The third son of Joe and Fannie Sawyer is believed to still be living.
      4. Herbert Sawyer (1931-2000) was married and had children. He lived most of his life in Cocke County, Tennessee. 
I don't mean to give short shrift to the women of the family, or to those children who died young. They are cherished and recorded in my data. But they do not pass on the yDNA I am seeking.

I would dearly love just one or two minutes of time with any direct male descendant of Archie and Crofford. It won't hurt a bit. Just a little swab. Promise.


Written for Amy Johnson Crow's blogger challenge 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks.


Photo Credit AttributionNoncommercialNo Derivative Works Some rights reserved by Phil Romans

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